Pwyll, Prince of Dyfed.

“Pwyll Prince of Dyfed“, is hunting on his own land and meets the shining Cŵn Annwn or “Hounds of Annwfn”, and takes another man’s kill, a stag, for himself. Arawn, the king of Annwfn, is greatly offended. As recompense, Pwyll switches bodies with Arawn and dwells in Annwfn to vanquish Arawn’s adversary, Hafgan as well Pwyll chastely shares the queen’s bed for a year. Pwyll defeats Arawn’s enemy Hafgan, and is then rewarded with and alliance between his land of Dyfed, and Annwfn. Pwyll then returns home to Dyfed where he finds it has been well ruled by Arawn in the past year.

Next, Pwyll encounters Rhiannon, a beautiful and powerful maiden on a shining magical horse. They are strangely unreachable by anyone, for as they attempt to approach, Rhiannon and her horse get farther away. Finally, they ask her to stop in which she complies and it is revealed that Rhiannon has chosen Pwyll as her husband to which he welcomes. On Rhiannon and Pwyll’s wedding day in the court of Hyfaidd Hen, Gwawl vab Clud appears in disguise and tricks Pwyll into giving him the entire wedding feast and Rhiannon. Rhiannon then guides Pwyll through a cunning strategy using her magic bag which can never be filled, to extricate her from her betrothal to the princely Gwawl. Gwawl is trapped in the bag and beaten by Pwyll’s men until he agrees to Rhiannon’s terms, including foregoing vengeance.

Rhiannon eventually bears Pwyll a son and heir, but the child disappears the night he is born. Rhiannon’s maids in fear of their lives, accuse her of killing and eating her own baby. Rhiannon negotiates a penalty where she must sit at the castle gate every day for seven years telling her terrible tale to strangers and offer them a ride on her back. Meanwhile, the child is rescued from its monstrous abductor by Teyrnon Twrf Lliant. He and his wife adopt the boy who grows heroically apace, and adores horses. They called him Gwri Wallt Evryn (Gwri ‘Golden Hair’, WelshGwallt Euraid). Teyrnon sees the boy’s resemblance to Pwyll, so he restores the boy to Dyfed for a happy ending. Rhiannon is vindicated as is Pwyll’s loyalty to her. Their son is renamed Pryderi “Loss”, as is custom from his mother’s first words to him: “Pryderi” puns on anxiety and labour. In due course, Pryderi inherits the rule of Dyfed.

From WIKIPEDIA.

Today’s music is a long one but the video is great.

face paint 1

Teenage Mutant Ninja Reuben.

car 67

Car 67 by Driver 67

Have a wonderful week everyone. Don’t forget that smiles can be contagious so make sure as many people catch them as possible. Hugs are good for your health so make sure you get plenty and to be fair, give plenty back too. Get permission first though eh?

 

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23 Comments

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23 responses to “Pwyll, Prince of Dyfed.

  1. Hi, David. For some reason, I’m getting the message “NOT FOUND” on this post.🙄Suzanne

    On Thu, Jul 13, 2017 at 8:23 AM, barsetshirediaries wrote:

    > davidprosser posted: ” “Pwyll Prince of Dyfed”, is hunting on his own land > and meets the shining Cŵn Annwn or “Hounds of Annwfn”, and takes another > man’s kill, a stag, for himself. Arawn, the king of Annwfn, is greatly > offended. As recompense, Pwyll switches bodies with Arawn ” >

  2. Which all goes to prove how complicated life could become in those magical, mystical times? I put it down to the number of ‘w’s – no language can survive that many ‘w’s! Hugs, Fred.
    Reply

  3. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life and commented:
    David Prosser shares some of the intracacies of Welsh myths… Wales has a colourful past like most of the Celtic lands… their stories are legendary.. plus a great post of the next generation doing their bit for legend..

  4. Thanks for sharing this lovely story, David. Your grandkids are adorable. In Afrikaans we have a phase “Hulle is so oulik” – they are so cute!

    • Thanks so much. Always monsters in myths aren’t there. I wonder what they represent really. Of course if they mention the red dragon, that’s real enough.
      I bet they don’t have a phrase for “The little thug ran over my foot”.
      xxx Massive Hugs xxx

  5. Your work always makes me smile, David.
    Well done once more.

  6. Seems like everyone is getting into everyone else’s business in this legend! But why does only the woman suffer for seven years? A few of the guys deserved equal or more 🙂 Love the video, David, and the kids pics are always delightful ♥♥♥

    • Yes, it does seem that way Tina. No idea why the woman should suffer at all, never mind for 7 years but was it true anyway?
      Glad you enjoyed the video, I did too. Thank you, the kiddies are awesome.
      xxx Gigantic Hugs xxx

  7. Confusion abounds even in mythical times my friend. Lovely post and cutie little grandies! And yes, hugs are always important so here are a few (((((((((((ginormous)))))))))) ones for you. 🙂 ❤

  8. Hugs and smiles to you, dear David–

  9. Claire@LinleyRoss

    I really enjoyed this post, thanks! I don’t know much Welsh mythology, though bits of this story ring a bell so it seems I’ve stumbled across it before somewhere…

  10. Thanks so much Gayatri. I thought the music and this piece from Lord of the Rings matched perfectly.
    xxx Huge Hugs xxx

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